New Kitchen and Homeware! ~ from Chefs Collection

I was recently sent some goodies in the post from Chefs Collection to try out some of their most popular kitchenware and bathroom products. I was delighted to receive these cute gifts in the post and I’d like to share my thoughts on these items after trialing them in my own everyday life over the last week.

Chefs Collection specialises in cookware, bakeware, homeware, and all manner of kitchenware you could wish for from top quality and unusual brands that you won’t find in your everyday high street store. They were founded in 2016 in Norwich, (my home town, incidentally) and they stock an impresive range of kitchen and home brands at really good prices. Well worth a browse if you’re looking for some attractive designs for homeware or even if you’re after a wedding or birthday gift.


Champagne flute: La Rochere ‘Bee’

This champagne flute is a beautiful and yet practical piece of glassware; it’s very sturdy, unlike a lot of champagne flutes that I find tend to topple over, but it’s also very delicate. It feels like an antique, classic French design at the same time as looking quite modern. You will also notice the little bees at the top of the flute – the only detail on the flutes and this cute feature adds a little bit of country charm. La Rochere are inspired by 18th century designs and the bee flute takes me back to summers in the south of france, walking around lavender fields and vineyards. The brand dates back to 1475 and La Rochere is the oldest working art glassworks in France.

As I’m currently 7 months pregnant, I can’t put these champagne flutes to their optimal use so I’ve opted for apple juice instead. I have to say, it makes a soft drink feel very elegant and classy. I’ve enjoyed drinking from these flutes in the garden, enjoying the last of the late summer evening rays after work, and they will be a regular feature on date night home-cooked dinners.

La Rochere Bee champagne flute

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Spreading knife – Opinel

The website declares that Picasso owned one of these knives! Quite a claim to fame for Opinel. I wonder if he used it for spreading jam on his toast or for painting his Cubist masterpieces?

This is another established brand, dating back to 1890, and the spreading knife is a new addition to Opinel’s range of simple and elegant kitchenware.

This knife is definitely a quality item; it feels very robust, which you don’t normally get in a spreading knife as they can be quite flimsy. The blade is spatula-shaped and lends itself well to spreading butter and jam. I used it to spread my favourite Lotus biscoff spread on a homemade banana bread I made recently (by the way, that’s a great combination.)

Opinel spreading knife

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Nail brush – Andree Jardin

Here we have another company with a history in France making iconic designs known for their quality. This beechwood nail brush has proved very helpful after an afternoon in the garden; getting the soil out from under those fingernails is a tough job! The nail brush is quite a simple design with soft bristles and delicate lettering on the underside. It’s comfortable to hold and it doesn’t take long to get the dirt off; it rinses well after use and is an attractive feature on a bathroom shelf.

I was a bit concerned to see the bristles are made from horse hair unfortunately and the wood is polished with beeswax; I recognise that for most people this would be a mark of quality but using animal by-products is a bit of a let down for me, and I hope the brand can move away from this in future as there are modern alternatives available. (Horse hair, by the way, is usually ethically and humanely ‘harvested’ from grooming but is nevertheless a by-product I’m not comfortable with.)

Andree Jardin nail brush

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* I received these products for free to write an honest review of them. Thanks to Chefs Collection for sending me these items to try out. *

 

 

 

 

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The garden in summertime

Every now and again it’s nice to update you on how my garden grows. I don’t know if you’re interested but I have a surplus of photos I need to share so there we go.

Right now I’m growing lots of herbs and while the spinach and chives have grown well from when I planted them in April, others are slower to take and I’m still waiting for the rosemary to show its first sprouts.

The roses are nearly all in bloom so everything is quite colourful at the moment. The sweat peas have in the last few weeks started to flower.

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I’m really impressed with this year’s display from my hosta. It always performs well but normally by this time it has been destroyed by slugs. I haven’t managed to put anything down to protect it so I’m relieved it’s still ok but we’ll have to see how long it lasts.

My so-called “hardy” fuschias did not really survive the Beast from the East and while one has started to leaf again the other has not shown any signs of life, which is a bit of a shame. I should have brought them in – I should do a lot of things I can’t be bothered with.

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Sweet peas

I’m loving the pond at the moment. The nearby fern is providing lots of wonderful shade and the marsh marigold is growing again, although still no flowers from it this year. I’ve seen a few frogs, which is wonderful as it’s what it’s there for. The cat still likes to drink from it, of course – what’s wrong with the fresh tap water we put down for her every day I do not know.

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That’s it for now. In the autumn I’m going to re pot the geranium and the erysimum as they have got too big for their boots.

Catch up on my other garden updates here and here.

New plants for the collection

So my cat sadly destroyed a little copper plant pot I had and also damaged the maidenhair fern it housed. My calathea has also been suffering – it’s lost all stability, so it needs some R & R time “off exhibition” for a little while.

The upshot of all this disruption is that I’ve talked myself into buying a few more house plants for my collection (not that I needed much persuasion).

Pilea Peperomioides

Pinterest lovers will recognise the Chinese money plant and I’m so pleased to find one the size I wanted. I do have a mini Pilea but that will take years to grow so it’s nice to have an established plant.

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I’ve matched this plant with this gorgeous vintage pot I got from a garden centre – this is the Monza planter in vintage blue. I can’t find this particular pot online but here is a similar one by the same brand.

They’re really low maintenance and very architectural – they do look quite odd with their long stems and large circular leaves.

Air Plants

Nature has cleverly found a great way to grow plants in the driest desert conditions and hence we have air plants, so called because they don’t need to root in soil but can attach themselves to rock faces and suck out what little moisture they find.

As a house plant, this means they can be left in some decorative fashion and just occasionally soaked in water.

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The last air plant I had I did manage to kill, which is quite impressive for a plant that requires the barest minimum attention from me. I made the mistake of watering it in tap water and I live in a hard water area, which is not good for air plants as it blocks the trichomes apparently. So I’ll be careful to use rainwater in future.

I’ve put both in little terrariums and I love how odd they look.

 

Read more about my houseplant obsession here and here

Houseplant Appreciation Day

It’s January 10th and that means it’s Houseplant Appreciation Day!

Since I started obsessively buying houseplants a few years ago, I’ve brought my total up to around 50. In that time, yes, some have died from neglect, but most have survived, been re-potted, and placed in various locations about our cottage. They receive frequent compliments from guests and they give me a lot of joy. Sometimes when the telly is boring I find myself gazing at the greenery. It’s fun to try to spot the Calathea move.

I’ve written about house plants and their benefits before so I won’t recap. This post is really intended as a photo gallery of the house plants I currently have and to introduce my latest additions:

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Maidenhair fern

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So how to celebrate houseplant day? It seems appropriate to give them a water and a little feed. I use Baby Bio House Plant Fertilizer. Or you could be a great friend and give a gift of a house plant?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ficus

Garden update: July

I’m just sitting down with a cuppa after a morning’s hard graft in the garden. My back aches, my arms are pricked by thorns and there’s soil under my fingernails. And what’s all this effort for if I can’t share it on my blog?

My tomato plants have finally decided to grow some fruit. I know I started them late and they’ve had a too tough time in the heat (too much sunshine, huh? You’re supposed to be exotic) but at last they have grown a few flowers last month and now this month the tiniest, teeniest little green fruits have started to form. Here’s hoping for a warm autumn to give them a chance to grow and ripen.

 

Apples – the apple tree is blooming. It looks like it’s probably an ancient tree (we rent a Victorian mill worker’s old cottage) and it always does well (too well; I can’t eat that many apples.) I couldn’t tell you what variety but they are slightly on the sour side.

 

The pond: a toad moved in last month and he’s sticking around. The plants we bought have grown too large for this small sink pond so one of them might end up getting chucked. So far the toad has escaped the clutches of my murderous cat.

 

The herb garden:
 

Tell me how your garden’s growing! 

 

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